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Meredith Kunz

The ancient Cynics: A backdrop to Stoicism

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

“The Cynics firmly established the responsibility of each individual to live a moral life, and the importance of self-discipline and indifference to pleasure or pain in the pursuit of virtue. They also established a tradition of questioning the validity of every assumption until proof can be found.”


On human fallibility

Editorial || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

Humans are fallible. In fact, the Stoics thought that we are so fallible that none of us ever gets to be completely virtuous. They said only a sage can be virtuous and, for all practical purposes, no one ever gets to be a sage.


The Stoic triad

Feature || MERDITH KUNZ

Three concepts of Stoic thinking that we can apply in everyday practices – approaches that anyone could implement.


Pick the right handle

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

“Everything has two handles, the one by which it may be carried, the other by which it cannot. If your brother acts unjustly, don't lay hold on the action by the handle of his injustice, for by that it cannot be carried; but by the opposite, that he is your brother, that he was brought up with you; and thus you will lay hold on it, as it is to be carried.” - Epictetus, Enchiridion, 43


The story of the Stoic archer

|| MEREDITH KUNZ

Great wisdom traditions tell great stories. Stories help us learn and remember difficult or elusive ideas. Stories humanize complex concepts. And stories about people are relatable – especially if we can put ourselves in the shoes of the story’s character(s).


Finding value wherever you go

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

“So here’s to “what you make of it,” no matter what “it” is.”


The Stoic struggle: The moral self caring for others

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

“What are tragic stories except descriptions of people who went after external things that were not under their control, failed, and as a result, suffered?” - Epictetus, Discourses, 1.4


Stoic morality

Editorial || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

Morality is said to exude charisma. From Socrates to Gandhi, people who held no formal power exuded moral authority and have attracted people drawn by their moral charisma.


Stoic-style coping: New research

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

“A study led by researchers at Harvard confirmed what modern Stoics already knew: It’s not the situation itself that causes our emotional turmoil, it’s how we think about it..”


Leaving your comfort zone

Editorial || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

We cover in this issue some of the less commonly discussed themes of Stoicism. Our contributors in this issue argue that we are used to comforts, pity others who are less fortunate, find it hard to cope with situations like the pandemic, find it difficult to cope with transience and imperfection, and we are tired.


What we see ... and what we don’t

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

“Seeing can help us understand the urgent need to try to do something. I realize I can only do what’s within my power, but I hope I’ll find ways to learn and act,”


On seeing clearly

Editorial || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

In A Scandal in Bohemia, a conversation between Sherelock Holmes and Watson goes like this:


Traps we set for ourselves

Editorial || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

Stoicism is a philosophy of life. Its path may be hard but it sets no traps. The Stoic traps we discuss in this issue are the traps we set for ourselves when we practice Stoicism. And such traps are many.


Can you do Stoicism the easy way

The Stoic Gym || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

In this issue of THE STOIC, our contributors offer simple ways of practicing Stoicism. 


Enjoying the festival of life vs. trying to get more

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

“I stop and remind myself daily that I have a singular shot at this life – both as a lover of knowledge, and as a human who dances, sings, and enjoys celebrating at the festival.”