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Meredith Kunz

Can you do Stoicism the easy way

The Stoic Gym || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

In this issue of THE STOIC, our contributors offer simple ways of practicing Stoicism. 


Enjoying the festival of life vs. trying to get more

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

“I stop and remind myself daily that I have a singular shot at this life – both as a lover of knowledge, and as a human who dances, sings, and enjoys celebrating at the festival.”


Judging Life By Its Length

The Stoic Gym || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

In the 5,000 year old epic Gilgamesh, the King of Uruk, Gilgamesh sets out to find the secret of immortality. He undertakes an ardous journey and faces many dangers in his quest. In the end, he comes to the understanding that humans cannot be immortals. All we can do is to live our lives well here on this earth.


How To Measure Ourselves

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

We live in an age of measurement. Data is constantly being gathered about us and used to measure and predict how we behave. When we go online we are being tracked and assessed, feeding into marketing profiles. Even in the physical world, cameras are recording us, and our iPhones and smart watches absorb a huge amount of information about our activity, down to our stride length.


What Are You Giving Up?

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

Striving for externals


Concentration in a World of At-Home Distraction

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

Do with “genuine seriousness, tenderly, willingly”


"There, But For The Grace of God,..."

The Stoic Gym || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

John Bradford, the Sixteenth Century English Reformer, was a humble man. He was the Chaplain to King Edward VI. Yet, it is said that, whenever he saw a criminal led to his execution, Bradford would exclaim,

There, but for the grace of God, goes John Bradford!


Freedom in a World of Fortune's Arrows

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

How can Stoic philosophy help us understand what it means to be free? It’s a question that has preoccupied Stoics both ancient and modern.


Reflecting On Life

Book Review || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

As ‘the year like no other’ comes to a close, we may want to reflect on our lives so we may steer them better in the new year. In this issue of THE STOIC, our contributors provide excellent perspectives on living a better life, no matter what we have been through this year.


Waking Up To Impermanence

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

“There is no actual tomorrow.” My daughter said this to me as we talked about the way people experience time. It’s true: We’re always living in the right now, today. And we always seem to imagine that tomorrow will be just the same as today.


Focus on goodness

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

Happiness, wealth, and power

We can all think of people in public life who have accomplished big things and earned wide recognition, wealth, and power, even reaching the highest political offices or C-suite jobs.


Think like a Stoic, change your brain

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

Turning ourselves into better humans

The study of how to turn ourselves into better humans sometimes suffers from a lack of “hard evidence.” I am a science writer, and I always look for quantitative as well as qualitative data when evaluating any practice or behavior.


Stoicism and the art of friendship

Feature || CHUCK CHAKRAPANI

A curious philosophy

Stoicism is a curious philosophy. At its core is the strong conviction that we need nothing and need no one to be happy. Epictetus clearly summarizes this conviction.


Friendships in hard times

Feature || MEREDITH KUNZ

Living in challenging times

We are living in challenging times. As Covid-19 continues to ravage wide sections of the globe, many of us are experiencing social isolation, and much worse.


Looking at things from a Stoic perspective

Between Us || Chuck Chakrapani

How do we react when unexpected things—such as a job loss or a health problem—happen to us? How do we react to predictable daily events? We often react to events in a way that causes more misery. Many people get depressed by they way they habitually react to things.